Dining - Too noisy

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If you're eating in a restaurant that is too noisy, you should complain immediately.

If the music in the restaurant is too loud, you could ask a member of staff to turn it down. If other patrons are being noisy or boisterous, you could ask to be seated at another table.

Should this not resolve the issue, you can complain to the manager. They may offer you a reduction in your bill, a complimentary drink or even just an apology. If you feel your complaint is not taken seriously, you should write a formal letter of complaint to the restaurant manager.

You should know
  • Always try to resolve your issue while you're still at the restaurant
  • Notices limiting the restaurant's liability must be prominently displayed
  • The food should be of a ‘satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, and as described’
  • Service must be carried out with ‘reasonable care and skill’ and ‘within a reasonable time’
  • Restaurants are only responsible for damage to personal items if it is due to negligence on the part of the restaurant

The Consumer Rights Act

The majority of your rights come from the Consumer Rights Act 2015. The Consumer Rights Act sets out what you should expect when you pay for a restaurant meal. It also outlines what you should expect when things aren't up to a reasonable standard.

ADR

Certified third-party mediators, called Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) providers, are available to all businesses to help when a dispute cannot be settled directly with the consumer. The system offers a quicker and cheaper way of resolving disputes than going via the courts. Once the internal complaint process is exhausted, businesses must give the consumer details of a certified ADR provider and tell the consumer if it is willing to use them. However, businesses do not have to use ADR unless they operate in a sector where existing legislation makes it mandatory, such as in financial services.

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Helping you with Too noisy

Resolver covers the issue Too Noisy for 162 companies and organisations:

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