TV programs - Content wasn't impartial

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Any factual content (like the news) has to presented accurately and with appropriate impartiality.

Presenters must not use the advantage of regular appearances to promote their views in a way that makes the content any less impartial. If they do, they could be breaking the rules.

If you think that any content wasn’t appropriately impartial, you should contact Ofcom via Resolver.

You should know

Ofcom

Ofcom is the independent regulator for the UK’s communications services.

They keep an eye on broadband, phone services, TV and radio, making sure that everyone gets the best possible service.

Ofcom is responsible from keeping you safe from scams, harmful or offensive material, unfair treatment in programmes, and invasion of privacy.

While they don’t handle individual disputes between you and your TV service provider, they are able to tackle complaints about the content you see. 

Ofcom isn’t able to take complaints about:

  • Advertising
  • The BBC World Service
  • The BBC Licence fee
  • Post offices
  • Newspapers and magazines
  • What people write or post on the internet

If you’re complaining about a BBC programme, it’s always best to contact the BBC first.

If you submit a complaint to Ofcom, they’ll generally investigate the matter and may issue a sanction if necessary.

Bear in mind that if you’re complaining to Ofcom about a specific program, you should try and do so within 20 days of the broadcast.

The Ofcom Broadcasting Code

The Ofcom Broadcasting Code (the Code) sets out the principles and rules that broadcasters have to stick to. 

The rules set out in the Code are intended to protect viewers and listeners from bad broadcasting practices. 

The Code doesn’t try to address every case that could arise, but instead gives a line of best practice for broadcasters to follow.

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Helping you with Content wasn't impartial

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